Gastric Bypass

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (Gastric Bypass)

The gastric bypass is considered the ‘gold standard’ of weight loss surgery.

​How Does It Work? 

There are two components to the procedure. First, a small stomach pouch, approximately one ounce or 30 milliliters in volume, is created by dividing the top of the stomach from the rest of the stomach. Next, the first portion of the small intestine is divided, and the bottom end of the divided small intestine is connected to the newly created small stomach pouch. The procedure is completed by connecting the top portion of the divided small intestine to the small intestine further down so that the stomach acids and digestive enzymes from the bypassed stomach and first portion of small intestine will eventually mix with the food.

The gastric bypass works by several mechanisms. First, similar to most bariatric procedures, the newly created stomach pouch is considerably smaller and facilitates significantly smaller meals, which translates into less calories consumed. Additionally, because there is less digestion of food by the smaller stomach pouch, and there is a segment of small intestine that would normally absorb calories as well as nutrients that no longer has food going through it, there is probably some degree less absorption of calories and nutrients.

Most importantly, the rerouting of the food stream produces changes in gut hormones that promote satiety, suppress hunger, and reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes.

​Advantages

  1. Produces significant long-term weight loss (60 to 80 percent excess weight loss on average)
  2. Restricts the amount of food that can be consumed
  3. May lead to conditions that increase energy expenditure
  4. Produces favorable changes in gut hormones that reduce appetite and enhance satiety
  5. Typical maintenance of >50% excess weight loss

​​Disadvantages

  1. Is technically a more complex operation than the band or sleeve procedure, and therefore has the potential for increased rates of complications
  2. Can lead to long-term vitamin/mineral deficiencies, particularly deficits in vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and folate
  3. Generally has a longer hospital stay than the band procedure
  4. Requires adherence to dietary recommendations, life-long vitamin/mineral supplementation, and strict compliance with post-operative instructions

**DISCLAIMER: The information and content provided herein is for informational purposes only, and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. It does not establish a physician-patient relationship and should not be construed as medical advice.  The information is not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider.  Should you have any health care related questions, promptly call or consult a physician or healthcare provider. No information contained in this website should be used by any reader to disregard medical and/or health related advice or provide a basis to delay consultation with a physician or a qualified healthcare provider.  If you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.

Author
Dr. Ditto

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